TimePilot Enterprise: Data Transmission Via the Internet

TimePilot Enterprise also gives remote users the ability to transmit their clock-in and clock-out data to the TimePilot database at their "headquarters." The data collected by the remote clocks is sent via "the Cloud" to headquarters.

To use this feature, you'll need an account at Dropbox, a free Cloud service. 

To better illustrate this feature, here are two fictional examples:

Example 1

Smith State Bank uses TimePilot timeclocks to track its employees' work hours. The bank has a TimePilot Vetro timeclock at its main office and Vetros at its two branches. The Vetros at the main office and at Branch No. 1 run on local area networks within each building. The Vetro at Branch No. 2 is not on a network. All three facilities have internet access.

At each bank branch, the clock-in and clock-out data is collected and sent to the Cloud, which then relays it to the bank's main office.Here's what happens at each location: 

  • When employees at the main office clock in and out, their data is instantly stored in the TimePilot database.

  • At Branch No. 1, the TimePilot software runs as a service on the network's server. When employees clock in and out at their Vetro clock, the service sends the data immediately to the main office via "the Cloud." The data can be viewed at the main office in seconds.

  • At Branch No. 2, the Vetro clock is not connected to a local area network, so a supervisor collects the data on the TimePilot USB Drive. The USB drive is inserted into a computer at the branch running Clock Manager, and Clock Manager sends the data to the main office via "the Cloud."

In all three situations, all the employee clock-ins and clock-outs end up in the TimePilot database at the main office. It doesn't matter to the software which clock the employee uses: Each clock-in or clock-out is identified by its location, so if necessary employees can clock in for the day at one office and clock out for the day at another.

Example 2

Jones Construction has weatherproof, battery-powered TimePilot Extreme Blue clocks at three remote construction sites. The sites are 50 miles away from the company's main office, where office employees use a TimePilot Vetro connected to a PC to clock in and out.

The three foremen at the construction sites have iPhones or Android phones with the TimePilot Extreme Blue App.

Foremen gather clock-ins and clock-outs from their work site’s Extreme clocks with their USB drives. When they get  home to their computers, they plug in their USB drives and send the data to the main office via the Cloud.Here's what happens at each location:

  • When employees at the main office clock in and out, their data is instantly stored in the TimePilot database.

  • Employees at the construction sites clock in and out. The foremen use their phones to collect the clock-in and clock-out data from the clocks. They make any corrections necessary right on the spot, then send the data to the main office. The data is retrieved by TimePilot Central's Clock Manager at the main office. This saves the foremen from making a 100-mile trip just to drop off the data at the main office.

Whether local or remote, all the employee clock-ins and clock-outs end up in the TimePilot database at the main office. It doesn't matter to the software which clock the employee uses: Each clock-in or clock-out is identified by its location, so if necessary employees can clock in for the day at one work site and clock out for the day at another.

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